Gazette
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The Alamo Hotel/Plaza of the Rockies
The Alamo Hotel, built in the early1880s and later named to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the siege of the Alamo, served as a posh downtown hotel with shops and restaurants until 1974, when all but the north tower and southern corner came under the wrecking ball.

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The Antlers/Penrose Library Garage
The Antlers Garage, built in 1901, has a decorated tile fašade featuring an antlered buck. Though the garage itself was torn down in 1996, the fašade was preserved and is now a parking lot for the Penrose Public Library.

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The Burns Opera House/Chief Theater
The grand Burns Opera Theater, built in 1912, was a monument to the Cripple Creek fortune of its owner Jimmy Burns. The ornate auditorium replete with cherubs and green velvet seats could fit 1,500. In 1973, in disrepair, it was knocked down to make way for a parking lot.

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The Cotton Club
The turn of the century brick store front that housed the Cotton Club from 1955 until 1975, an ethnic and cultural crossroads, was torn down in 1975 and replaced with an anonymous modernist building typical of the era.

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Kiowa Street from the Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind
Looking west from the top floor of the Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind, photographer William H. Jackson snapped this photo of Colorado Springs in the 1880s. Though trees now hide them, many of the original houses on the street remain, as does the timeless profile of Pikes Peak. The apparent change in the alignment of the street in the two photos is due to the original building burning down. The new building is slightly south.

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Perkins-Shearer building
Much of North Tejon Street has changed little in the past century, including the Perkins-Shearer building. This photo from the 1920s or 1930s shows shops rugs and furniture. Today this space sells men's formal wear.

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Colorado Springs High School
The original 1882 Colorado Springs High School, whose soaring stone turrets won a design award at the World's Fair in Chicago, grew to be viewed as a relic and was torn down in 1938 as a New Deal job program. The statue of the William J. Palmer remains.

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Pikes Peak Avenue
Pikes Peak Avenue, the original street in Colorado Springs, still aligns with the summit that bears its name. However, the Antlers Hotel, which once framed the peak, was torn down in 1964. So were a number of other historic buildings that once lined the avenue.

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Sol's Dairy
The century old shed at 632 N Prospect Street was a small dairy in the 1920s. Mary Ford, who was born in 1915 and lived in the house next door her entire life, said a man named Sol used to process milk there at a time when fields of dairy cows were only a few blocks away.

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Warehouse

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The old Gazette Newsroom
This section of Pikes Peak Avenue, between Cascade Avenue and Tejon Street, was once a crowded business district that included, among other things, the offices of the Colorado Springs Gazette build in 1890(far left). This photo shows the block in 1952, the buildings were torn down one by one to make room for parking lots. The Gazette building was torn down in 1973.

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Colorado College
Cutler Hall, the oldest building at Colorado College, photographed on the barren prairie in 1889. Today the lush campus includes dozens of buildings spanning several city blocks.